Whats New on Unam Sanctam Catholicam?

Catholics and Tithing

How do various Christian groups differ from each other regarding the amount of money donated to their respective churches? Every major study in recent years that I am aware of has verified that Catholics are the most penurious of all Christian groups; typically we are ranked at or close to dead last in giving. What does dead last look like? In most studies it is about 1.25% to 1.5% of gross income (for comparison, the highest was around 6.1% for the Reformed Church in America. Mainline liberal Protestant churches hovered around 2.5 to 3%). The "penurious Catholic" trend was even the subject of a book authored by Charles Zech and printed by Our Sunday Visitor back in 2000 called Why Catholics Don't Give...And What Can Be...


Read More...

Status and Contract

In his classic 1937 work The Crisis of Civilization, Hilaire Belloc summarizes the development of Christendom and diagnoses with precision how the rejection of the Catholic Church at the time of the Protestant Revolt is responsible for the social and economic troubles of the modern world. The most pressing economic problem is that the vast majority of people are wage-earners to a small owner class who have a disproportionate control of the means of production. This situation Belloc calls 'Proletarianism.' While modern wage-earners have political rights, full economic freedom eludes them because they are too dependent upon those who pay their wages. Unlike the Communists, who assert that the evil is in private ownership of property, Belloc states the problem is not that capital is...


Read More...

Israelite Houses in Egypt

According to the Biblical narrative, the Israelites dwelt in Egypt abount four centuries, for the latter part of that time as slaves. Much effort has been expended seeking for archaeological evidence of the long Israelite sojourn in Egypt. Tantalizing hints about Israel's presence in Egypt are found in certain pottery fragments discovered in Avaris (the biblical Goshen), in certain Egyptian inscriptions, and in some New Kingdom artistic representations. These are but glimpses, however. Full scale, undeniable hard evidence of an Israelite presence in Egypt between 1700-1300 BC. has yet to emerge. We should not make too much of this, however. Much of the physical culture of the ancient Egyptians themselves has vanished; tombs and temples remain, but the houses of the average Egyptian peasant are...


Read More...

Watchers and Nephilim

In our previous article on the Nephilim, we have examined the various places in the Scripture in which the Nephilim are mentioned and sketched out some very rudimentary ideas about their identity. This was all by way or preparation for this article, which will take a much more in depth look at the Nephilim and the Watchers, the mysterious fathers of the Nephilim. These "Watchers", known as the Grigori in Hebrew, the "sons of God" who went in to the daughters of men in Genesis 6. Who are these Grigori? Are they fallen angels? Or, as some assert, are they merely the human descendants of Seth? The answer is relevant not only to the identity of the Nephilim but to the very interpretive lens with...


Read More...

Prayer Book Rebellion (1549)

In the year 1536, Catholics of northern England famously participated in the ill-fated "Pilgrimage of Grace", a peaceful demonstration against the Protestant reforms of Henry VIII. This is but one example of how the people of England cherished the Catholic Faith, and why that kingdom was always referred to affectionately as 'Our Lady's Dowry.' The Catholics of England were not willing to sit idly by while the faith of St. Augustine was destroyed by Protestant usurpers, even if that usurper sat on the throne. Just as Henry's innovations provoked the Pilgrimage of Grace in 1536, so the more radical innovation of Cranmer's Prayer Book of 1549 provoked a massive rebellion in Cornwall and Devon. Born of outrage against the concept of an English liturgy, this...


Read More...

Christian Contemplation vs. Pagan Meditation

We live in a world which increasingly rejects Catholic tradition while simultaneously professing great interest in spiritualities influenced by the New Age. Christians have been traditionally reluctant to embrace such practices, as they contain elements that are fundamentally opposed to the most basic tenets of Christianity. Some, however, have merged various elements of eastern mysticism and New Age neo-paganism with traditional Catholic spirituality, thrown in some Christian vocabulary and are now peddling these practices as compatible with Catholicism. The method of "Centering Prayer" promoted by the late Cistercian monk Basil Pennington is the most famous example, but there are others. These practices are promoted as Christian forms of "contemplation", and Catholics are encouraged to participate. In this article we will look at how to discern...


Read More...

Returning to a Morality of Happiness

The modern Church seems crippled when it comes to its moral teaching. Of course, many in the hierarchy openly dissent from the Catholic moral principles. But even among those inclined to defend them, there seems a growing uncertainty about how to explain them. Similarly, the Catholic laity are as little disposed as ever to live by them; hence the complaint of the bishops in the Instrumentum Laboris of the 2014 Synod on the Family that a morality grounded in natural law is "incomprehensible" to most Catholics. Thus dissent and confusion are the order of the day. As with many problems in the modern Church, this difficulty is bound up with an abandonment of the teaching of St. Thomas on morality. In order to build a...


Read More...

Introducing RCIA Power Points!

When this website was launched in 2012, one of the major motivations behind its establishment was to set up a place to host the 32 RCIA lesson plans I created when I was a Director of Religious Education so that they might be made freely available to anyone who wished to utilize them. Since then, our free RCIA lesson plans have been viewed 8,000 times; in fact, our RCIA page (http://www.unamsanctamcatholicam.com/home/parish-resources/83-parish-resources/120-rcia-classes.html) is the single most-viewed page on this entire website by far. Since we do not sell these lesson plans but offer them for free, I have no idea how many times they have been downloaded, but I suspect it is several thousand. Many people, priests and laypersons alike, have stepped forward and generously offered...


Read More...

C.S. Lewis, the Psalms, and Modernism

What are traditional Catholics to make of C.S. Lewis? Is he to be enlisted in the defense of the faith as an ally, or is he an author that needs to be warned against? Everybody understands that C.S. Lewis was not Catholic, and consequently we do not expect to see Catholic truths taught and defended in his writings [1]. But beyond this omission, where does Lewis fall on the problems of Modernism? Is he a staunch defender of traditional Christianity against the Modernist tide, or is he himself a promoter of Modernist idea? Or perhaps, like much else about Lewis, is the answer somewhere mysteriously in the middle, a dallying with "mere Modernism" without affirming the radical conclusions of the more extreme Modernists? In this article,...


Read More...

Vincentian Canon and Unanimous Consent of the Fathers

In the mid 17th century English Protestant divine William Chillingworth derided the concept of an unbroken apostolic tradition. In his book Religion of the Protestants, Chillingworth asserted that "There have been popes against popes: councils against councils: councils confirmed by popes against councils confirmed by popes: lastly the church of some ages against the church other ages" [1]. This assertion attempts to negate the force of the Catholic argument that Protestantism is not a fitting expression of Christian unity, since Protestant sects contradict each other. Chillingworth argued that the Catholic "unanimous consent of the fathers" is a mere illusion, a dream of Catholic apologists. It was Chillingworth's argument in part that prompted Cardinal Newman to write his famous Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine....


Read More...
0123456789



History of the Catholic Church

  • Israelite Houses in Egypt

    According to the Biblical narrative, the Israelites dwelt in Egypt abount four centuries, for the latter part of that time as slaves. Much effort has been expended seeking for archaeological evidence of the long Israelite sojourn in Egypt. Tantalizing hints about Israel's presence in Egypt are found…

    Read more: Israelite...

Theology & Liturgy

  • Watchers and Nephilim

    In our previous article on the Nephilim, we have examined the various places in the Scripture in which the Nephilim are mentioned and sketched out some very rudimentary ideas about their identity. This was all by way or preparation for this article, which will take a much more in depth look at the N…

    Read more: Watchers and...

Catholic Spirituality

  • Christian Contemplation vs. Pagan Meditation

    We live in a world which increasingly rejects Catholic tradition while simultaneously professing great interest in spiritualities influenced by the New Age. Christians have been traditionally reluctant to embrace such practices, as they contain elements that are fundamentally opposed to the most bas…

    Read more: Christian...

Movie Reviews

Economy & Society

  • Status and Contract

    In his classic 1937 work The Crisis of Civilization, Hilaire Belloc summarizes the development of Christendom and diagnoses with precision how the rejection of the Catholic Church at the time of the Protestant Revolt is responsible for the social and economic troubles of the modern world. The most p…

    Read more: Status and...